As part of IEN’s mission to develop and cultivate the next generation of technologists, our team hosts numerous professional development lectures and short courses. Course and lecture topics include cleanroom fabrication techniques, advanced lithography techniques, market sector applications of nanotechnology research, and seminars on nanotechnology as it relates to other fields of engineering. These events are open to both GA Tech and other institutions’ researchers and educators, as well as to those in industry and the interested public.

May 7: Elionix ELS-G100 100 kV Electron Beam Lithography System – Enabling Nanotechnology

Elionix ELS-G100 100 kV Electron Beam Lithography System – Enabling Nanotechnology

May 7, 2020 | 11:00 am - 12:00 pm (EDT)
 
Presented by Devin K. Brown, Senior Research Engineer, IEN 
 

Abstract: The Elionix ELS-G100 is a direct write electron beam lithography system that uses a 100 kV acceleration voltage and a 1.8 nm spot Gaussian beam to achieve nanometer scale resolution. The Elionix electron beam lithography tools are known for ultra-high precision to fabricate small nano-structures with excellent reliability. The ELS G-100 is capable of generating patterns with a line width of 5 nm. A 20bit DAC provides high beam positioning resolution. In addition, the laser interferometer with its reading resolution of 0.31 nm enables a stitching accuracy of 15 nm and overlay accuracy of 20 nm. The tool features a maximum field size of 1 mm and a scanning frequency of 100 MHz. Sample sizes can be handled from small millimeter size pieces up to full 8” diameter wafers. This 30-minute webinar will provide an overview of the ELS-G100 system with a discussion of key features and capabilities followed by time for Q & A.

Bio: Devin is currently a Senior Research Engineer in the Institute for Electronics and Nanotechnology. He has held that position since 2002. His research interests have included fabrication of nanoscale devices and nanoscale process development. He is currently pursuing a PhD in electrical and computer engineering and his thesis is on nano-newton force transduction. Prior to Georgia Tech, he was a Senior Yield Engineer at Intel Process Technology Development group in Hillsboro, Oregon from 1995 to 2002. His positions there included managing an Ion Implant process module initially and then later front end transistor performance process development. He graduated from Georgia Tech in 1995 with an MSEE and in 1993 with a BEE.

To register for this Webinar please use the following link: https://tinyurl.com/IENExperts2

Spring 2020 NANOFANS Webinar Series: “Nanotechnology in Infectious Diseases (Diagnostics/Therapeutics)”

Spring 2020 NANOFANS Webinar Series: “Nanotechnology in Infectious Diseases (Diagnostics/Therapeutics)

 
May 1-27, 2020 | 11:00 am - 12:00 pm (EDT)

Spring 2020 NanoFANS (Focusing on Advanced Nanobio- Systems) program will be offered in a weekly webinar format during the month of May. The focus of this event will be Nanotechnology in Infectious Diseases (Diagnostics/Therapeutics).” 

In the current global pandemic situation, infectious diseases are the leading cause of mortality worldwide, with viruses such as, ebola, SARS-Cov, SARS-Cov-2 in particular, making global impact on healthcare and socio-economic development. The rapid development of drug resistance to currently available therapies and associated side effects leads to serious public health concern; hence, devising novel treatment strategies is of paramount importance. The application of nanotechnology in infectious diseases is fast-revolutionizing the biomedical field and the healthcare sector and has a potential to diagnose, treat and prevent diseases.

Event Speakers:

May 1:    Aniruddh Sarkar, Professor of Biomedical Engineering; Georgia Institute of Technology | “Microscale Tools for Biomarker Discovery and Electronic Point-of-Care Diagnostics for Infectious Diseases”

May 6:    Philip Santangelo, Professor of Biomedical Engineering; Georgia Institute of Technology | “RNA-based Drugs for Treating Influenza and SARS-CoV-2”

May 13:  Gabe Kwong, Professor of Biomedical Engineering; Georgia Institute of Technology | “Point-of-Care Diagnostics via DNA-Based Isothermal Amplification and Paper Test”

May 20:  Susan Thomas, Professor of Mechanical Engineering; Georgia Institute of Technology | “Engineered Biomaterials Reveal Viral Immunity Mechanisms and Augment Therapy”

May 27:  M.G. Finn, Professor of Chemistry & Biochemistry; Georgia Institute of Technology | “Virus-Like Particle Approaches to Coronavirus Diagnostics and Vaccines”

 
Please click the link:  https://tinyurl.com/spring2020nanofansforum to learn more about the webinar dates, read the talk abstracts & speaker bios, and register to attend.

Meeting URLs will be provided to all those registered prior to the event. 

You are cordially invited!

May 14: Photolithography at GT-IEN: An Overview of Processes and Equipment

Photolithography at GT-IEN: An Overview of Processes and Equipment

May 14, 2020 | 11:00 am - 12:00 pm (EDT)
 
Presented by Dr. Hang Chen, Senior Research Scientist Process Support Manager
 

Abstract: Photolithography has always been the most important technique in microelectronics fabrication. It uses light to transfer a geometric pattern from a photomask (also called an optical mask) to a photosensitive (that is, light-sensitive) chemical photoresist on the substrate, or it can be directly written with a UV-laser equipment. It provides precise control of the shape and size of the objects it creates and can create patterns over an entire surface cost-effectively. The Georgia Tech Institute for Electronics and Nanotechnology (IEN) cleanroom provides various types of photolithography equipment to satisfy different processing needs. Each tool has its own unique characteristics and serves different purposes. In this seminar, a brief introduction to the equipment and patterning capabilities of the IEN will be presented. Common processing issues related to photolithography will also be discussed.

Bio: Dr. Hang Chen received his bachelor and master degrees in chemistry from Fudan University in Shanghai, China. He obtained his doctorate, also in chemistry, from Georgia Tech in 2005 and was a post-doc at the Nanotechnology Research Center before joining the IEN as a Research Scientist in 2008. Currently, he is the process support manager at IEN. His research interests include chemically sensitive field-effect transistors, MEMS-CMOS device integration, and organic electronics.

To register for this Webinar please use the following link: https://tinyurl.com/IENExperts2

May 21: Laser Micromachining at GT-IEN

Laser Micromachining at GT-IEN

May 21, 2020 | 11:00 am - 12:00 pm (EDT)
 
Presented by Richard Shafer, Manager, Laser Micromachining Lab. GT-IEN

Abstract: The Institute of Electronics and Nanotechnology (IEN) Laser Micromachining Laboratory has been in operation since 2014.The mission of the laser micromachining laboratory is to provide the capability to laser machine parts to researchers from academic, industry and government agencies at an affordable rate. Come learn about what services the IEN micromachining laboratory offers including, Nd:Ylf laser machining, deep ultraviolet(DUV) laser ablation, RF-excited CO2 laser machining and a new Femtosecond Laser Micromachining System. The lab houses laser cutting machines that operate at several wave lengths to allow machining on abroad spectrum of materials and also offers an Aerosol Jet Printer that allows the printing of ink onto various substrates down to 10um line widths.

Bio: Richard Shafer was born in Bloomfield, New Jersey on August 6, 1952. He moved to Lexington, KY, in 1958 when his father took a position at the newly constructed IBM plant in Lexington. Richard studied Electrical Engineering at the University of Kentucky, and after word’s worked in various fields. Shafer came to Georgia Tech in 1999 to work in the MSE department on an improved electron emitter source for deep space ion engines. He worked along with the JPL on a part of an ion engine for the Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter (JIMO) project. When Richard started working with Dr. Mark Allen in 2005 as a lab manager, part of his responsibilities were to run the laser micromachining operations that were commissioned to make MEMS devices. In 2015, the laser micromachining equipment became part of the shared facilities at the IEN. Mr. Shafer manages the Laser Micromachining Lab and external labs in room 148 of the Petit Building. Richard has his name on +12 published papers and over 50 acknowledgments of his work and assistance in other researcher’s publications.

To register for this Webinar please use the following link: https://tinyurl.com/IENExperts2

May 28: Etching at GT-IEN: A Review of Processes and Equipment

Etching at GT-IEN: A Review of Processes and Equipment

May 28, 2020 | 11:00 am - 12:00 pm (EDT)
 
Presented by Dr. Mikkel Thomas, Research Engineer, Senior Process Engineer, GT-IEN 
 

Abstract: Etching is one of the fundamental building blocks of microelectronic fabrication. Removing material through chemical or physical means is an essential skill found in most microelectronics laboratories. The Institute for Electronics and Nanotechnology (IEN) at Georgia Tech offers a wide variety of tools and technologies to etch materials during a multitude of fabrication processes. Tools range from typical plasma enhanced etchers to vapor based etchers. With 15+ etch tools in the facility, IEN staff has the flexibility to configure each tool with a different selection of gases, which enables different etch capabilities and allow the IEN to segregate processes within the facility. In this seminar, a brief introduction to the tools and technologies available in the IEN cleanrooms will be presented. Common etching issues and concerns will also be discussed.

Bio: Dr. Mikkel Thomas has worked for the Institute for Electronics and Nanotechnology since 2008. He earned a Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering in 1997, a Master’s of Science in Electrical Engineering in 1999 and a Ph.D.in Electrical Engineering with a specialization in Optoelectronics in 2008, all from the Georgia institute of Technology. Prior to his employment at Georgia Tech, Dr. Thomas worked at OptiComp Corporation located in Zephyr Cove, Nevada. His research at the company revolved around the development of a VCSEL based, integrated optical communication system for use in satellites and other aerospace applications. Since arriving at Georgia Tech, in the IEN, Dr. Thomas provides cleanroom processing support to the academic faculty and their graduate students. He also provides processing support and fabrication services for entities not directly affiliated with the institute. He is the current lab instructor for ChBE 4050.

To register for this Webinar please use the following link: https://tinyurl.com/IENExperts2